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Essays On Human Rights And Terrorism

Essays On Human Rights And Terrorism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video & Photos

October 3, 2016 Video

A Tunisian man formerly held in secret United States Central Intelligence Agency custody have described previously unreported methods of torture that shed new light on the earliest days of the CIA program. Lotfi al-Arabi El Gherissi, 52, recounted being severely beaten with batons, threatened with an electric chair, subjected to various forms of water torture, and being chained by his arms to the ceiling of his cell for a long period.

  • September 30, 2016 Video

    Laila Matar’s statement for Human Rights Watch at the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland on September 28, 2016.

  • September 30, 2016 Video

    Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 General Assembly resolution 217 A as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into almost 500 languages.

    Preamble

    Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,

    Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,

    Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law,

    Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations,

    Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

    Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in co-operation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms,

    Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge,

    Now, Therefore THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY proclaims THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

    Article 1.

    All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

    Article 2.

    Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

    Article 3.

    Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

    Article 4.

    No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

    Article 5.

    No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

    Article 6.

    Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

    Article 7.

    All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

    Article 8.

    Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

    Article 9.

    No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

    Article 10.

    Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

    Article 11.

    (1) Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.
    (2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.

    Article 12.

    No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

    Article 13.

    (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state.
    (2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.

    Article 14.

    (1) Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.
    (2) This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

    Article 15.

    (1) Everyone has the right to a nationality.
    (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

    Article 16.

    (1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.
    (2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.
    (3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

    Article 17.

    (1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.
    (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

    Article 18.

    Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

    Article 19.

    Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

    Article 20.

    (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.
    (2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

    Article 21.

    (1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.
    (2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.
    (3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

    Article 22.

    Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

    Article 23.

    (1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.
    (2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.
    (3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.
    (4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

    Article 24.

    Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

    Article 25.

    (1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.
    (2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.

    Article 26.

    (1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.
    (2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.
    (3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

    Article 27.

    (1) Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.
    (2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

    Article 28.

    Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

    Article 29.

    (1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.
    (2) In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.
    (3) These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

    Article 30.

    Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.

    Illustrated Version

    Human Rights

    The Human Freedom Index
    by Ian Vasquez, Tanja PorcnikFraser Institute. 2015
    The Human Freedom Index is the most comprehensive measure of freedom ever created for a large number of countries around the globe. It captures the degree to which people are free to enjoy major liberties such as freedom of speech, religion, etc.
    (292 views)

    Discrimination at Work: Comparing European, French, and American Law
    by Marie Mercat-BrunsUniversity of California Press. 2016
    Powerful and incisive, the book examines issues such as racial and religious bias, sexual harassment, gender discrimination, and equality for LGBT individuals, highlighting comparisons that will further discussions on human rights across borders.
    (219 views)

    Human Rights and the Borders of Suffering
    by M. Anne BrownManchester University Press. 2002
    This book argues for greater openness in the ways we approach human rights and international rights promotion, and brings some new understanding to old debates. It casts human rights as a language for probing the political dimensions of suffering.
    (348 views)

    Women’s Rights Handbook
    Office of the Attorney General. 1998
    This is a summary of women’s rights in important areas such as employment, economic independence, education, housing, health care, domestic relations, violent crimes and child care. It also provides other valuable information related to those rights.
    (1833 views)

    Human Rights and Democracy: The Precarious Triumph of Ideals
    by Todd LandmanBloomsbury Academic. 2013
    The author combines an overview of the key theoretical models of democracy and human rights with a state-of-the-art survey which reports on trade-offs between achievements, set-backs and challenges in some of the world’s ‘hotspots’.
    (3427 views)

    Can Human Rights Survive?
    by Conor GeartyCambridge University Press. 2006
    In this set of three essays, originally presented in 2005, Conor Gearty considers whether human rights can survive the challenges of the war on terror, the revival of political religion, and the steady erosion of the world’s natural resources.
    (3325 views)

    Tortured Justice: Using Coerced Evidence to Prosecute Terrorist Suspects
    by Deborah Colson, Avi CoverHuman Rights First. 2008
    The book finds the Bush Administration has undercut its own intended use of the military commission system at Guantanamo Bay by allowing the admission of coerced evidence. The report focuses on six prisoners who have alleged abuse while in custody.
    (3500 views)

    Imbalance of Powers
    Lawyers Committee for Human Rights. 2003
    This report examines a wide range of actions taken by the United States government over the last six months (the booklet is published in 2003) in response to the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
    (3606 views)

    A Gay Humanist Manifesto
    by Alan KeslianGayles Books. 2011
    This booklet gives a gay perspective on humanist beliefs. It counters the rejection of same sex attraction on moral and religious grounds. It argues for a positive outlook on the place of lesbians and gay men in the modern world.
    (4649 views)

    Hidden Slaves: Forced Labor in the United States
    by Kevin Bales, Laurel Fletcher, Eric StoverHuman Rights Center. 2004
    Because forced labor is hidden, inhumane, widespread, and criminal, sustained and coordinated efforts by U.S. law enforcement, social service providers, and the general public are needed to expose and eradicate this illicit trade.
    (5738 views)

    Freedom of Information
    by Toby MendelUNESCO. 2008
    This book makes a significant contribution to the existing literature on freedom of information. It will be a valuable resource to the many people all over the world who wish to promote effective legal guarantees for the right to information.
    (8936 views)

    Fresh Perspectives on the ‘War on Terror’
    by Miriam Gani, Penelope MathewANU E Press. 2008
    This book engages critically with the metaphor of war in the context of terrorism. The authors write about terrorism from the perspective of international law, public and constitutional law, criminal law and criminology, and legal theory.
    (9034 views)

    In Modern Bondage: Sex Trafficking in the Americas
    DePaul University College of Law. 2005
    This second revised edition includes the expanded findings of trafficking of women and children for purposes of commercial sexual exploitation in the Americas. Included are the regional overview of Belize, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, etc.
    (6811 views)

    Palestinian Refugees: Challenges of Repatriation and Development
    by Rex Brynen, Roula El RifaiI. B. Tauris. 2007
    This book explores the challenges which the return of refugees to a future Palestinian state would generate. The book addresses key practical questions, such as how the repatriation of refugees would affect the Palestinian economy.
    (5274 views)

    Freedom from Want: The Human Right to Adequate Food
    by George KentGeorgetown University Press. 2005
    Worldwide hunger is best addressed as a human rights issue. Kent analyzes the current deplorable state of world hunger and malnutrition, demonstrating how governments, not food shortages or climates or famine, are to blame.
    (7526 views)

    You’ll Learn Not to Cry: Child Combatants in Colombia
    Human Rights Watch. 2003
    Guerrilla in Colombia rely on child combatants, who have committed atrocities and are even made to execute other children. This is the first report published on this issue, it documents how illegal armies have recruited increasing numbers of children.
    (5661 views)

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