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Average Viagra Price

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Cost of Buying Viagra at CVS, Walgreens, and Walmart Pharmacy

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Viagra can be purchased online as well as from bricks and mortar pharmacies.

What You’ll Pay for Prescription Viagra Pills at Major U.S. Pharmacies

If you live in the United States, you are probably used to high costs for prescription drugs. Even the largest pharmacy chains — like CVS, Walgreens, and Walmart — can only reduce costs so much with their enormous bulk purchases.

When it comes to buying 10 Viagra tablets of 100mg each. costs are as follows at each of these chain pharmacies:

  • CVS: $446.99 ($44.70 per tablet)
  • Walgreens: $420.99 ($42.10 per tablet)
  • Walmart: $421.20 ($42.12 per tablet)

There are ways to work around these costs. For example, many pharmacies price 100mg tablets the same as 50mg tablets.

That means if a physician deliberately prescribes 100mg tablets for someone who needs 50mg tablets the patient can cut the 100mg tablets in half and essentially get their Viagra for half price.

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A large number of men with ED prefer to use online facilitators like AccessRX.com to fill their prescriptions for erectile dysfunction drugs. For only $20 more per order than your local pharmacy, the benefits by ordering online outweigh the costs of going to your local pharmacy. Customers choose Accessrx.com due to cost, convenience, or to maintain privacy. Some men are uncomfortable with the idea of their local pharmacist knowing that they take an ED drug, and so they use an online pharmacy for privacy and have the medications delivered right to their door.

Sales of ED drugs have soared as baby boomers approach retirement.

The Cost of Treating ED

The cost of treating erectile dysfunction is a subject of increasing interest as baby boomers approach retirement age. The incidence of ED increases with age, and with health conditions such as diabetes and coronary artery disease. But with the cost per tablet at around $30, the expense can be difficult to justify for many people. Furthermore, neither Medicare nor many private insurance plans covers the cost of ED drugs.

In 2005, Congress removed coverage for ED drugs from both Medicare and Medicaid, and many self-funded health coverage plans and private insurers followed their lead. A number of health insurance programs contractually excluded treatment for ED shortly after Viagra was introduced to the market back in 1998.

In the clinical journal Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics . M.C. Hornbrook and J. Holup of The Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, asserted that exclusion of insurance coverage of ED drugs “is arbitrary and discriminatory (particularly against older men) and has no business, medical, or ethical rationale. Coverage of ED prescriptions should be included in basic health benefits by all public and private payers and health-care delivery systems when indicated to maintain, restore, or compensate for loss of function caused by disease, injury, or medical treatment.”

This should not discourage men with ED from discussing their concerns with a physician. Many doctors are willing to work with patients to help get the costs down, with techniques like the process described above of prescribing 100mg tablets that can be cut in half.

Only a Fraction of Men with Erectile Dysfunction Use ED Drugs

Insurance companies excluded Erectile Dysfunction drugs from their contracts for fear that the costs would be prohibitive. However, a study of a managed care claim database of 28 million individuals in 51 health plans in the U.S found 285,436 claims for men with ED whose health plans covered ED treatment.

The estimated cost of ED care — including physician evaluation, diagnostic procedures, and ED drugs — in health plans with 100,000 members or more was only about 71 cents per member.

Insurance plans that cover ED drugs are able to control costs by limiting dispensing of ED drugs. For example, one plan allows coverage of up to 6 tablets per month, with plan members paying out of pocket if they want more. One study estimated median annual Viagra use at only 29 tablets per year, or around 2.5 tablets per month. Whether such studies will eventually result in more plans covering ED drugs remains to be seen.

Inflation rates for drug costs have far exceeded national inflation rates.

Changes in Costs of ED Drugs

Since its introduction to the market in 1998, the price of Viagra has risen by more than 100%. The same has been true of Cialis, which increased in price even more rapidly. While many generic drug makers were looking forward to the expiration of Pfizer Inc.’s patent for Viagra in late March 2012, a court ruling in August 2011 is putting the kibosh on generic versions.

According to a report by Bloomberg News. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. in particular was blocked from marketing a generic version of Viagra until 2019.

The court ruling was a surprise, according to Bloomberg’s Asthika Goonewardene, who said, “The patent was a method-of-use patent, and usually these don’t hold up that well in court for small molecular drugs. The court’s decision to uphold this patent means other filers wanting to enter in 2012 are not likely to do so then.”

While some men will take chances with so-called generics from overseas, the FDA has shown that many counterfeit medications entering the U.S. are ineffective or even harmful.

A 2011 court ruling may mean delays for generic ED drugs coming onto the market.

Reactions from Organizations like AARP

The increase in prices for ED drugs only reflects the overall trend toward high rates of inflation for pharmaceuticals. A 2010 report by the AARP says that around 75% of prescriptions in the U.S. are generic, and that in 2009 the costs of most popular name-brand drugs increased by more than 8%, despite the fact that U.S. consumer prices on average that year actually dropped by about 0.5%.

From 2004 to 2010, overall inflation was 13.3%, yet the cost of non-generic drugs increased by 41.5% over that same time period.

These increases hit older Americans particularly hard. Many Medicare recipients are instructed to use name-brand drugs, yet choose generics to avoid reaching the “donut hole” in Medicare drug coverage. Once medication costs surpass $2,830 in a year, the recipient must foot the entire bill for medications until costs reach $4,550.

From 1998 to 2006, Viagra’s wholesale price went up by 36.4%, followed by an additional 78.1% price hike from 2006 to 2010. And with the court ruling against Teva Pharmaceuticals, price relief may be slow in arriving.

For those interested in getting a great price on ED drugs like Viagra, online facilitators like AccessRX.com provide competitive prices along with the discretion and privacy that many consumers want.

AccessRx is a USA corporation founded in 1998. Since, we have become one of the top online providers in FDA-approved, brand-name medications. We specializes in providing our over 500,000 customers with relevant product and condition information created by our professional editorial staff which includes our team of medical writers, medical practitioners and health educators. AccessRx Staff on Facebook

Mary Hiers – AccessRx Medical Writer

Mary Hiers is a full-time writer with a background in engineering and print journalism as well as writing about a wide variety of health care topics. She lives in Tennessee and is the author of two works of fiction. Mary earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Tennessee and the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Mary Hiers on Google+

Lisa Furgison – AccessRx Medical Writer

As a journalist Lisa enjoys writing about a variety of topics. Over the course of the last ten years she has been involved in television news as well as print and online publications. Medical news has always been a favorite for this native New Yorker because she gets to stay on top of the latest developments in a rapidly changing field. Lisa Furgison on Google+

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Average Cost of Viagra Is $23.15; Click for More

Erection problems are estimated to affect more than 18 million American men.

Erection problems are a widespread problem among American men, affecting more than 18 million males over the age of 20, according to data from a research study conducted by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Although the incidence of impotence increases with age, the inability to get and keep an erection is not an inevitable consequence of aging but rather reflects overall health and lifestyle choices.

If you are among the millions of men who are experiencing difficulty in getting and keeping an erection strong enough for sexual activity, help may be available in the form of Viagra, the little blue pill that revolutionized the treatment of erection problems when it was first introduced in 1998.

Helps Promote Blood Flow

Viagra is generally helpful to men whose impotence stems from decreased blood flow to the penis, which accounts for the lion’s share of erection problems among men in the United States and elsewhere. It is less successful in overcoming erection problems that are psychological in origin or those that are caused by traumatic injury to the penis or pelvic region.

Sildenafil citrate is the active ingredient in Viagra, which can be purchased for an average price of $23.15 per 50-milligram dose from Viamedic.com, a member of the Secure Medical family of online drugstores. In addition to all FDA-approved impotence medications, Viamedic also sells several other medications and health products, all of which are sourced from licensed U.S. pharmacies.

How to Get This Price

To get Viagra for this price, you must order five to nine 100-milligram tablets from Viamedic, and split each of those tablets in half with the pill-splitter that comes free of charge with your order. An order of five 100-milligram tablets costs $231.50 but yields 10 doses of 50 milligrams each at a cost of $23.15 per dose. Order up to nine 100-milligram tablets, and the unit cost per 50-milligram dose remains at $23.15.

For even greater savings, you can order larger quantities of the drug. For example, order 10 100-milligram tablets and your unit cost per 50-milligram dose drops to $22.90. If you’re feeling truly expansive, you can place an order for 30 100-milligram tablets, which drops your cost per 50-milligram dose to $21.60.

Best to Start with Small Order

If you’re not already familiar with Viagra and whether or not it works for you, getting started with a small order probably makes the most sense. If you find that it produces the desired results with little to no side-effects, you can place a larger order down the line.

Viagra and other PDE5 inhibitors allow most men with erection problems to at least temporarily recover erectile function.

Prior to the introduction of Viagra and the other similar medications that followed, psychological issues got the blame for the bulk of erection problems. It is now widely recognized that compromised blood flow to the penis is responsible for most impotence.

Like many breakthroughs in medical science, Viagra’s ability to improve erectile function was discovered pretty much by accident. Medicinal chemists working at Pfizer’s Sandwich, England, research center were studying sildenafil citrate as a possible treatment for angina pectoris and high blood pressure.

Although the drug produced somewhat lackluster results in treating those medical issues, researchers soon became aware that male test subjects were reluctant to give up their medication. It turned out that one of the drug’s side effects was to promote erections ¨that were harder, firmer, and lasted longer,¨ according to Brian Klee, a senior medical director at Pfizer.

Project Takes New Direction

Pfizer’s research project then took a new direction, culminating eventually in the first PDE5 inhibitor designed to promote blood flow to the penis and thus make it possible for some men who had lost erectile function to regain it, if only temporarily.

Viagra and the drugs that have followed it — Levitra, Cialis, Staxyn, and Stendra — all belong to the class of medications known as PDE5 inhibitors. Although each has its own unique chemical structure, all of them work in very much the same way.

PDE5 inhibitors get their name from their ability to temporarily disable a natural enzyme known as phosphodiesterase-5. To understand how these drugs work, it’s helpful to know a little bit more about the overall mechanics of the erectile function.

No Spontaneous Erections

Folks who are unfamiliar with Viagra and its fellow PDE5 inhibitors sometimes mistakenly think that the drug itself causes an erection to spontaneous appear not long after the medication is taken. Even with the help of Viagra, erections still happen the old-fashioned way, which begins in the brain as feelings of sexual desire.

Once such feelings are detected, the brain sends a flood of nitric oxide, a chemical messenger, to the pelvic region, which in turn triggers still other chemical reactions, one of which creates a natural substance known as cyclic guanosine monophosphate, or cGMP.

You can save on Viagra by purchasing 100-milligram tablets and cutting them in half to yield twice as many 50-milligram doses of the drug.

To facilitate erection, cGMP relaxes the smooth muscles that line the blood vessels supplying the penis. As these muscles relax, the blood vessels dilate, and blood flow increases significantly. In this way, blood rushes into the spongy erectile tissues of the penis and creates an erection.

How Viagra Works

One of the primary functions of the PDE5 enzyme is to break down cGMP. For men who have experienced narrowing of the arteries due to atherosclerosis or because of heavy smoking and other unwise lifestyle choices, the enzyme can prematurely shut down or compromise the erectile process before it is complete. Viagra and the other PDE5 inhibitors prevent this by temporarily deactivating the enzyme for a period of four to 36 hours depending on the particular impotence drug you select.

As you can see, the effects of Viagra and other impotence drugs give you a window of time during which you can more readily get and keep an erection strong enough for intercourse. The drug doesn’t offer a permanent solution to your problem, but it does allow you to resume a relatively normal sex life. By making certain healthy lifestyle changes and working with your doctor, you may in time be able to reduce some of the damage done to your vascular system and thus be less dependent on outside help. In the meantime, Viagra offers a sensible way to get the job done.

Generally Safe and Effective

Clinical trials have demonstrated that Viagra is both safe and effective for most men. Certain mild side effects might be experienced when you first start using the drug, although these generally disappear upon continued use. Such common side effects include diarrhea, facial flushing, headaches, nasal congestion, nausea, and stomach pains.

Among the more serious side effects that Viagra sometimes causes are temporary loss of hearing or vision; irregular heartbeat; swelling in the hands, legs, or feet; fainting or lightheadedness; chest pain; ringing in the ears; or an erection that lasts four hours or more. While this final side effect might seem at first glance to be an unexpected bonus, a protracted erection such as this can cause permanent tissue damage and is a medical emergency. In fact, if you experience any of these more serious side effects, you should seek immediate medical attention.

Don Amermanis a freelance author who writes extensively about a wide array of nutrition and health-related topics.

  • Viamedic Medical Staff Writers

    Viamedic is a USA corporation founded in 1998. Since, we have become one of the top online providers in FDA-approved, brand-name medications. We specializes in providing our over 500,000 customers with relevant product and condition information created by our professional editorial staff which includes our team of medical writers, medical practitioners and health educators. View Viamedic Staff on Google+

    Viamedic Medical Writer: Don Amerman

    Don Amerman has spent more than three decades in the business of writing and editing. During the last 15 years, his focus has been on freelance writing. For almost all of his writing, He has done all of his own research, both online and off, including telephone and face-to-face interviews where possible. Don Amerman on Google+

    The Current Price of Viagra

    Posted by: Mary Hiers in Viagra October 29, 2012 0 21888 Views

    In 1998, when Viagra was introduced, if a pharmacy wanted to purchase Viagra, they paid $7 per 50 mg pill. In 2012 dollars, that would be $9.94 due to inflation. However, pharmacies today pay $22.12 per pill, so clearly factors other than general cost-of-living increases are at play. Based on a survey of pharmacies in and around the Chicago area, the average cost of Viagra is now just under $25 per pill .

    While Viagra is still a top seller for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), it is also competing against other ED drugs, particularly Cialis. So it seems astonishing that Pfizer, the maker of Viagra, is able to get away with charging 316% what it did in 1998.

    From 2006 to 2009, Pfizer reported that U.S. sales of Viagra rose from $796 to $962 million, an increase of 21%. During that same time period, the number of prescriptions written for Viagra in the U.S. dropped by 13%, from 11.2 million to 9.9 million. Pfizer’s revenues went up because they raised prices enough to more than offset the drop in Viagra consumption. The following graph shows the price trend for Viagra from March 1998 through June 2012.

    Viagra prices from March 1998 through June 2012

    General Drug Price Trends

    The AARP Public Policy Institute studied prices on a combined set of commonly-prescribed drugs (brand name, specialty, and generic) from 2005 through 2009, and determined that prescription drug prices rose at a rate that was nearly double the overall inflation rate. This overall trend showed up in spite of significant decreases in the price of generic drugs. From 2005 through 2009, prices of the prescription drugs studied by the AARP rose by 25.6%, compared to a general inflation rate of 13.3%.

    In 2009 alone, prescription drug prices for brand name and specialty drugs rose by 8.3% and 8.9%, while prices for generic drugs in 2009 decreased by 7.8%. The overall inflation rate in 2009 was -0.3%. The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) counters that in 2010, retail drug spending grew by only 1.2%, a historically low rate. The drugs studied by the AARP were those that were mostly likely to be prescribed to people with Medicare Part D coverage, so they may not reflect the overall picture of drug prices that closely. Still, however, there is little argument from anyone that prices of name brand prescription drugs in all categories have continued to increase.

    Reasons Pharmaceutical Companies Raise Prices

    According to a 2011 CBS MoneyWatch article. pharmaceutical companies raise prices for a variety of reasons, including:

    New Monopolies for Old Generics: Companies can take old generic drugs that were “grandfathered” in when the FDA was formed and apply for FDA approval for them. If a company is the first to apply for FDA approval, they are essentially given a monopoly over the drug when approval is granted, forcing older makers out of business.

    It pays to shop around for price differences on Viagra. A couple of dollars per pill can add up.

    Promotion of Off-Label Uses: While doctors frequently use drugs “off-label,” or for uses they were not designed for, pharmaceutical companies are not allowed to promote off-label use. Nonetheless, some pharma companies have been caught doing so and fined by the FDA. However, the fines are chump change compared to the profits gained from off-label use.

    Drug Price Fraud: This happens when companies publish fake prices in formularies that the government uses for reimbursement. From 2009 through 2010, however, the government managed to recover $5 billion in overcharges from drug companies.

    Monopolies, Plain and Simple: Until drug patents run out (which usually takes a decade), Medicare cannot negotiate prices but is bound by a formulary which may be based on incorrect published prices as noted above.

    Injectable Drug Price Loopholes: Medicare is required to pay the entire price of an injectable no matter how high, while pills require a co-payment.

    More Difficulty for Whistleblowers: Federal court decisions have made it harder for federal prosecutors and whistleblowers to bring cases against pharmaceutical companies that give kickbacks to doctors and pharmacies.

    Heavy Lobbying in D.C.: The healthcare reform act does not allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices, and this is blamed on the influence of drug company lobbyists in Washington.

    Pharmaceutical companies have a lot of political power and aren’t afraid to use it.

    Deals Between Pharmaceutical Companies and Competitors: Drug companies can and do pay competitors to drop challenges to their drug patents, and the practice is legal.

    Use of Fake FDA Approval Dates and Codes: When companies submit claims for reimbursement, Medicare doesn’t often check dates and code numbers, causing them to reimburse drug companies for things like vitamins and even popsicles.

    The “Because We Can” Argument: Drug companies do need to have profits in order to fund drug research, but that is not the only reason they raise prices. In many cases, drug companies raise prices in an attempt to see just how much consumers will pay. Since Viagra remains a billion-dollar-per-year moneymaker for Pfizer, consumers obviously aren’t balking too much about price increases.

    Competition in the ED Drug Market

    Why hasn’t increased competition in the ED drug market from drugs like Cialis, Levitra, and Staxyn resulted in lower prices? Mainly because the market is big enough that the companies making the drugs can continue to raise prices, and men will continue to pay them. In other words, Pfizer and other ED drug makers have not yet found the price “ceiling” above which men simply won’t buy the product.

    Makers of ED drugs have not yet reached a price ceiling above which sales drop significantly.

    What About Generics?

    This is big factor in the price of ED drugs. Pfizer’s original patent for Viagra was set to expire in March of 2012. However, after a courtroom battle, the patent has been extended to April 2020. In March 2010, Pfizer sued Teva Pharmaceuticals, an Israeli drug manufacturer that wanted to introduce a generic version of Viagra to the U.S. market when Pfizer’s patent expired in 2012.

    Pfizer’s argument was that a second patent on Viagra, one which specifically indicated use of Viagra for treating ED, didn’t expire until 2019. This “method of treatment” patent held up in court, and Teva was sent packing. Furthermore, Pfizer was granted an additional six-month extension of patent protection for Viagra, because the company is studying the use of a drug containing Viagra’s active ingredient for treating children with a condition called pulmonary hypertension.

    As for the other major drugs for ED, Cialis won’t come off-patent until at least 2017, and Levitra won’t be off-patent until at least 2018. So all those Canadian pharmacies you see online selling “generic” versions of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra are lying to you!

    In the meantime, you’ll need to shop around for good prices on the name-brand, FDA-approved ED medications, and purchase them through a reliable source like online facilitator AccessRx.com. Buying generics made in other countries is illegal, and even if you’re not caught by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, your chances of ending up with a dangerous counterfeit product are too high to risk it.

  • AccessRx is a USA corporation founded in 1998. Since, we have become one of the top online providers in FDA-approved, brand-name medications. We specializes in providing our over 500,000 customers with relevant product and condition information created by our professional editorial staff which includes our team of medical writers, medical practitioners and health educators. AccessRx Staff on Facebook

    Mary Hiers – AccessRx Medical Writer

    Mary Hiers is a full-time writer with a background in engineering and print journalism as well as writing about a wide variety of health care topics. She lives in Tennessee and is the author of two works of fiction. Mary earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Tennessee and the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Mary Hiers on Google+

    Lisa Furgison – AccessRx Medical Writer

    As a journalist Lisa enjoys writing about a variety of topics. Over the course of the last ten years she has been involved in television news as well as print and online publications. Medical news has always been a favorite for this native New Yorker because she gets to stay on top of the latest developments in a rapidly changing field. Lisa Furgison on Google+

    AccessRx Reviews

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